honey bees

Honey bees on the farm will pollinate our flowers.  Todd began a relationship with honey bees over 50 years when he and his brother Tom, 9 years old, bought their first hive for their family farm. They were enchanted by how industrious the bees were, giving them honey, pollen, propolis and beeswax for candles and salve. Around 40% of what is eaten is pollinated by insects, this to a great degree by honey bees. Because there are so few nectar & pollen plants on Thornhill Farm, we are planting these plants for the bees. We know the soil is worn out on the farm because our honey bees make so little honey. This is why we have pigs. When the forest is cleared, we do not burn the wood that is left behind, but chip it and mix these wood chips with manure and fungus mycelium to make piles of compost to improve the soil. Last summer we grew peas and oats as a green manure crop, and the pea flowers gave voluminous amounts of nectar to the honey bees and pollinating insects.


 Health & the Hive: A Beekeeper’s Journey

A Jan Cannon Film that explores the importance of honeybees in our lives through the seasons of Honey Gardens Apiaries, Todd and the team. Topics addressed in the film include pollination, queen breeding, disease control, bee venom therapy, organic agriculture and honey-based plant medicine. 53 minute dvd. $10 + $4 (shipping).
to order, send a check to: 198 Taylor Road, Greensboro Bend, Vermont 05842


writings & images about the honey bees of Thornhill Farm


Live from the Hive by Annie Watson – Winter 1997 to July 2015 archives

  • beverage makin’ joy ! Historically, sodas and other thirst quenching drinks were prepared at home and had nutritional value. The ingredients were wild crafted and the results produced a beverage that was refreshing and also gave a boost to the system. Root beer, Jamaican style ginger ale, switchel, beet kvass, and kombucha tea have tonic effects on the body ...
  • fire & moving to the light of Spring For the last two weeks, we have made the rounds and visited each colony of bees. There is a lot of walking as the land is too wet to drive on to get closer to each yard this is part of the sacredness of the journey. The quietness of the fields is punctuated by the ...
  • the angels of agriculture healing with bees “Ouch, that one really, really hurt!” “That one was the kidney point representing fear.” That was what my acupuncturist/bee venom therapist said to me after stinging me with a bee. Acupuncture is based on releasing stuck energy through meridian points in the body. With bee venom therapy, the process is greatly enhanced. I was first ...
  • Traditions & Changes Our first honey house was in the international village of Morses Line, Vermont & Quebec. On the right of the road is the old Richard Brothers Apiary that we moved into. The second building on the right is the Bucket-of-Blood bar, with the Vermont-Quebec border in the middle of the bar. In the Prohibition, the ...
  • a relationship with the bees and plants I have found that when dealing with nature, if one is to adopt a faithful mentality, the wild forces drive what is needed to those places of wanting. For a year I had the desire to know my own bees and to have a colony to watch collect nectar. All of this came about in ...